Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation

Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation

Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation

Dr. Jed W. Fahey is a dietary biochemist with broad coaching and intensive background in plant physiology, human vitamin, phytochemistry and dietary biochemistry. He is the director of the Cullman Chemoprotection Center at Johns Hopkins.

The cause I’ve requested him to hitch us right now, specifically, nevertheless, is as a result of he has been researching isothiocyanates like sulforaphane for over 20 years and is an distinctive knowledgeable on this enviornment.

Dr. Fahey and his colleagues have been, in a giant manner, at the absolute middle of what’s a staggering quantity of analysis on these very highly effective compounds.

There is hardly a subject which we will focus on through which he does not have an anecdote a few research he was concerned in, or, in some instances, tribal information that won’t even be revealed however is nonetheless attention-grabbing and an essential a part of the story that’s distinctive to his specific vantage level.

▶︎ If you haven’t seen my earlier, extraordinarily in-depth video on sulforaphane, a vital isothiocyanate, please achieve this:

00:00:00 – Introduction
00:00:37 – Sulforaphane fundamentals
00:06:42 – NRF2 pathway
00:10:40 – Other cruciferous greens
00:16:55 – Endogenous intestine myrosinase
00:22:15 – Supplements
00:32:48 – Endogenous intestine myrosinase
00:43:00 – Inhibiting H. Pylori
00:52:28 – Inflammation and growing old
01:07:45 – Brain well being
01:19:00 – Conducting scientific trials
01:27:01 – Depression
01:31:05 – Global well being
01:42:35 – Air air pollution
01:50:10 – Maximizing sulforaphane conversion
02:09:35 – Cancer

Find out extra about Dr. Fahey and the Cullman Chemoprotection Center:

▶︎ The Cullman Chemoprotection Center Website:

▶︎ The Cullman Chemoprotection Center Facebook:

▶︎ Dr. Fahey’s Website:

▶︎ Dr. Fahey on Twitter:

Follow FoundMyFitness elsewhere:

▶︎ iTunes Podcast:

▶︎ Twitter:

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45 thoughts on “Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation”

  1. In this 2-hour and 30 minute interview, we discuss…
    00:00:00 – the early history of sulforaphane research, including key initial discoveries.
    00:00:37 – the serendipitous unfolding of events that lead to the converging of the research on the NRF2 stress response pathway with the sulforaphane-related research going on at the same institute Johns Hopkins.
    00:05:06 – why cruciferous vegetables bother to create isothiocyanates in the first place.
    00:07:26 – the involvement of the heat shock proteins, in addition to the increased activity of Nrf2, as an additional cellular response mechanism that's been observed in association with sulforaphane.
    00:08:11 – how sulforaphane affects a diverse array of biochemical processes from glutathione synthesis to elimination of reactive oxygen species and detoxification of harmful compounds, including carcinogens.
    00:15:01 – whether or not to cook your cruciferous vegetables.
    00:15:34 – the epidemiological (associative) evidence that cruciferous vegetable consumption may help reduce the risk of cancer.
    00:18:30 – the extremely unpredictable nature of endogenous conversion of glucoraphanin (the precursor) into sulforaphane between person to person.
    00:22:14 – practical information surrounding supplementation of sulforaphane.
    00:27:05 – the effect one particular french sulforaphane supplement had on the doubling rate of PSA, which is a marker for prostate cancer recurrence in prostate cancer patients.
    00:28:17 – the role that the Cullman Chemoprotection Center at Johns Hopkins has played, in addition to fundamental research, in providing early, vital infrastructure enabling some of the efforts of the international research community in elucidating the effects of sulforaphane and related compounds and the underlying biological pathways.
    00:28:26 – the incredible, almost geometric growth in new studies that has occurred since the advent of a few of the key discoveries about sulforaphane and its method of action.
    00:32:48 – the practicality of probiotics as a way to improve endogenous myrosinase activity needed to convert the precursor to sulforaphane into the bioactive sulforaphane.
    00:33:26 – the involvement of our gut bacteria in our ability to convert the precursor of sulforaphane into its active form.
    00:37:13 – whether or not endogenous myrosinase activity improves as a function of repeated challenge with glucoraphanin (the precursor to sulforaphane).
    00:39:30 – why probiotics may vary in their degree of efficacy.
    00:43:00 – why consuming isothiocyanates to reduce the number of bacterial colonies of h. pylori, a risk factor for peptic ulcers and stomach cancer, may turn out to be a better intervention than complete eradication of the species with antibiotics.
    00:47:21 – the bizarre relationship h. pylori has with childhood asthma, where it has been shown that having some h. pylori seems to reduce asthma incidence in childhood.
    00:52:28 – the effect sulforaphane has on inflammation and why inflammation is often a great therapeutic target for many different diseases, including diseases of aging.
    00:54:05 – the life extension properties broccoli has been shown to have in an insect model of aging.
    00:59:27 – the underlying causes of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and the promise sulforaphane may hold for this disease of rapid aging.
    01:09:00 – the effects of sulforaphane or Nrf2 activation on diseases of the brain, such as autism (human evidence) and Alzheimer's (animal evidence), possibly through anti-oxidative or anti-inflammatory effects.
    01:11:09 – the so-called autistic fever response whereby autistic patients report a sudden reversal of symptoms during brief periods of fever.
    01:10:05 – the role heat shock proteins might play more broadly in the prevention of certain neurological diseases.
    01:19:00 – the challenges inherent in clinical trials where scientists may be extremely optimistic about the effects that might be observed, but still have to exercise caution and choose trial conditions that may be conservative, for the good of the people whose lives and hopes hang in the balance.
    01:27:01 – the role of inflammation and depression and what some studies on animals have demonstrated in terms of sulforaphane's potential as an antidepressant.
    01:42:30 – a special isothiocyanate-containing plant known as Moringa or sometimes referred to as the drumstick tree or the horseradish tree.
    01:46:32 – Dr. Fahey's inadvertent foray into the consumption of exotic meats during a visit to Africa.
    01:51:15 – a compound commonly associated with broccoli: indole-3-carbinol and its downstream product diindolylmethane (DIIM).
    01:57:00 – the practicality of using mustard seed powder as an extra source of myrosinase, possibly for your cooked cruciferous vegetables.
    02:00:13 – whether or not it makes sense to freeze broccoli sprouts in order to extend their shelf life, and possibly even increase sulforaphane within certain contexts.
    02:05:25 – Dr. Fahey's thoughts on where endogenous conversion of glucoraphanin occurs in the body, as well as how long it takes before sulforaphane metabolites hit the bloodstream after ingestion.
    02:07:25 – Some general thoughts on frequency in terms of how often one might need to take sulforaphane to elicit its biological effects.
    02:12:16 – why sulforaphane may one day be a component of sunscreen.
    02:12:31 – what some of the upcoming trials involving sulforaphane are at the Cullman Chemoprotection Center.
    02:17:07 – the incredible way in which a sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout beverage was shown to dramatically enhance the detoxification of benzene through excretion: one study showed up to 61% starting immediately after supplementation.

  2. I live in Southern California in an off the grid community, I've been growing broccoli sprouts from fall to spring, it's too hot in the summer. I also have a moringa tree, every part of the tree is edible. My goal is to create a food oasis through permaculture. Funny, I do dehydrate a variety of lettuce, spinach, kale, green beans, okra, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, pomegranate, cherries, mango….also I have a desert peach tree, fig tree, a palm date, a Palo Verde tree, 2 mesquite trees, an orange tree, a lime tree and an apple tree. I can easily dehydrate all of this and I make jerky from the chickens and turkeys I raise. I feed them wheat grass sprouts among other sprouts and forage like purse lane. I mostly stick to a keto diet, I've reversed diabetes and lost 75 pounds. I feel younger at 46 than I felt at 26.? Learning about the science of nutrition is like my religion. ❤

  3. 15:31 ????
    51:17 ????
    52:53 ???? cytokinin also in Moringa ?
    1:33:00 ??
    Did you realize after talking for an hour and a half he goes into saying
    moringa is that good compared to the main topic says alot. It Should be explored for replacement of dead soil in dead zone area to replenish the dirt and feeds the people and animals all 9 essential Amino acids among the vast amount of antioxidant content.

  4. Great interview, however I looked up moringa on Amazon and many people had very very serious side effects. I checked different brands, including one he recommended.

  5. I have a supergreens suppliment of kale, moringa, and wheat grass, I get high when I consume some. I kid you not, the feeling is almost instantaneous, light headed and feeling happy.

  6. What a genuinely nice and knowledgeable man!? The interview is so long and it just keeps striking me how he is so pleasant and so careful in laying out his arguments and sharing his immense knowledge! He has a great voice too. 🙂

  7. Thank YouTube! I can’t imagine having to listen to all of these scientists, professors, and doctors on 1X speed!

    Always at least 1.5X, but if possible, 2X speed!

  8. The way he describes sulforaphane upregulating all of these protective enzymes in our bodies because it is a THREAT to us makes it sound like it’s acting almost as a vaccine because it isn’t strong enough to harm us.

    Or is it?

    Is broccoli BAD for us?

  9. Oh Lord, my God,
    When I in awesome wonder
    Consider all the Life Thy Hands have made.
    I study the cell.
    I graph the complex pathways.
    Thy wisdom throughout the human body displayed.

    Then sings my soul,
    My Savior God to Thee,
    How great Thou art.
    How great Thou art.

    Then sings my soul,
    My Savior God to Thee,
    How great Thou art.
    How great Thou art.

    I personally sit in silent awe
    every time I listen to these chemists, biologists, MDs, and researchers on YouTube. First in awe of their knowledge, of course. But then at the incredible complexity of the physical system we still are so far away from understanding.

    But I believe one day we will grasp its full complexity, as God intends we should.

  10. Dr. Patrick! How was your broccoli seed smoothie?

    Did you blend them with other fruits or veggies? Are there fruits or veggies that might deactivate the sulforaphane or stop the enzymatic reactions e we want?

  11. Oh Lord, my God,
    When I in awesome wonder
    Consider all the Life Thy Hands have made.
    I study the cell.
    I graph the complex pathways.
    Thy wisdom throughout the human body displayed.

    Then sings my soul,
    My Savior God to Thee,
    How great Thou art.
    How great Thou art.

    Then sings my soul,
    My Savior God to Thee,
    How great Thou art.
    How great Thou art.

    I personally sit in silent awe
    every time I listen to these chemists, biologists, MDs, and researchers on YouTube. First in awe of their knowledge, of course. But then at the incredible complexity of the physical system we still are so far away from understanding.

    But I believe one day we will grasp its full complexity, as God intends we should.

  12. I make an organic broccoli salad with organic raisins, organic sunflower seeds, organic red onion and bacon….. The dressing is organic mayo, ACV and a little stevia….. I make a big bowl weekly…. SUPER FOOD ?

  13. I wonder if asario seeds (long history of use in India and the Middle East). related to water cress and mustard (also known as 'garden cress'), would be a source of sulforaphane. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_cress This is a case where the seed itself DOES have a history of direct consumption and is prized as a medicinal herb. The seed also readily sprouts … so well, in fact, that it is often used in school experiments. Also known as aaliv or aleev or in Arabic as habbat as hamra.

  14. Meanwhile, carnivores are extremely lean, vibrant, and healthy, on a diet of red meat, salt, and water. Seriously, how is it so complicated? Is it really about sneaking bacteria past the stomach acid? Does it really require adding three more overpriced supplements that have to be refrigerated? How much shipping is required? How many supplements can you take? If all of this were necessary, we would never have made it this far. None of this was available 100 years ago. Maybe less is more.

  15. Database of glucoraphanin- Rhonda you mentioned that you would make available Dr. Fahey database of food items that contain glucoraphanin . Can you please let me know how to obtain that database? Randy Lipscher

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